About Allan Haverholm

Danish cartoonist living in Sweden. Graphic novelist and artist exhibited in the US, France, and Scandinavia. Former partner at Afart Publiishing (DK), co-editor at C'est Bon Kultur/C'est Bon Anthology (SE), co-founder of the Danish Comics Council. Coffee drinker, metalhead, dad.

Some more bookplates WIP

Having a bit of a slow day after last night’s art show in Copenhagen, so I cracked open a tube of printer’s ink and got to work on the last bookplates for the limited artist’s edition of When the last story is told:

image

I got a bit generous with the ink in some places, and I won’t be able to continue work on these until it dries, maybe tomorrow.

As I was mounting the paper base I caught myself doing colour compositions, moving the scraps around to sit better in relation to the others on the page… which is kind of stupid because they’ll all be cut apart and placed in individual books. It’s a slow day in so many ways.

Good morning Jurassic Dork!

Link

This forum post gives basic information on accessing the root folder of Windows web servers via Google search…
On one hand it’s deeply disturbing how easily you’re hacked, on the other I’m in awe at the technical agility of some people circumventing the security complex. Cut to archive footage of Jeff Goldblum in Jurassic Park: “Life will find a way—”

Clark Ashton Smith, and When the last story is told:

Quote

Those who are unconventional enough to credit me with rationality will smile at my story and deem that I have forsaken the province of bizarre pictorial art (in which I have achieved a certain eminence) to invade that of superscientific fiction.

— Clark Ashton Smith, in The Light from Beyond

You don’t think it’s too late to include that in my latest book, do you? :)

Security company tested the spread of personal data on the darknet.

Aside

[…] when the 12-day experiment was over, the data had traveled to more than 22 different countries and been viewed nearly 1,100 times.

The experiment conducted by security vendor BitGlass was aimed at getting an inside look at just what happens after cyber criminals siphon personal information from retailers and other breached organizations. BitGlass researchers generated a list of 1,568 phony names, SSNs, credit card numbers, addresses, and phone numbers, rolled them in an Excel spreadsheet and then “watermarked” it with their code that silently tracks any access to the file.

What Happens When Personal Information Hits The Dark Web
Via @YourAnonNews

Never not spied upon

It’s well established that accurately identifying a subject is trivial when you have access to that person’s daily location information.

—  Kaspersky Lab Official Blog How To Make Private and Anonymous Phone Calls

Good thing nobody knows where you are all the time — oh, wait, *cough* google *cough*

The article linked to above relates an artist’s proposed method for making a completely anonymous phone call. It’s a complicated process that requires Faraday Cages, quasi-darknet purchases and other clandestine behaviour — and not least buying a new burner phone each time you want to talk truly privately with your mom.